Doing The Right Way

Common Misconceptions About a Property Inspector

A property inspection is an independent, non-invasive inspection of the current state of a residential property, most often in relation to the selling of that particular property. Generally, home inspections are performed by a qualified home inspector who possesses the appropriate training and certifications in order to do such inspections on behalf of a buyer or seller. Inspection reports are usually sent to the customer for their own examination. A number of factors may affect the inspector’s findings. The time frame is one example of such an influence. It may be wise therefore to conduct such inspections prior to putting your property on the market.

A property inspector is also called upon to determine the existence of safety hazards in a given location. While safety hazards are not always the result of deficiencies in building construction, they can nonetheless be found to exist. In addition, some safety hazards are the result of age-old deficiencies that have been allowed to become ingrained through the passage of time. A qualified home inspector will identify such flaws. Such inspectors are also expected to conduct comprehensive tests on residential properties to ensure compliance with local, regional and national safety standards. All such inspections should be preceded by a satisfactory discussion between the client and the home inspector in order to ensure all necessary precautions are taken.

Communication skills are also important if you want to make the most of your property inspector’s visits. You will find that your inspector will provide you with a detailed description of the issues he is going to inspect, and he may ask you questions pertaining to safety, structural defects and compliance with local and national construction regulations. Consequently, it is important that you remain in close contact with him even after the inspection has been completed. It is in this communication phase that you are able to raise questions or seek clarification on any aspect of the inspection report.

The second most common misconception about plumbing and electrical inspections is that they are purely visual in nature. In fact, many inspectors go a step further and incorporate a number of laboratory tests as well. Such examinations help to detect problems that would otherwise go unnoticed during normal inspection activities. For example, leaks in underground pipes and faulty connections can usually be detected during a visual inspection. However, in a laboratory test, such problems can be detected and repaired before the home is even sold.

Many buyers often assume that a Property Inspector will verify the quality of the plumbing and electrical systems in a prospective property. While it is true that a Property Inspector is responsible for inspecting the integrity of the plumbing and electrical systems, he is also expected to verify the overall construction integrity of the building. This means that your plumbing and electrical system will not only be inspected for current compliance; your property inspector will also be required to determine any potential danger that leaks or other problems may present in the future. For instance, a property inspector is also likely to verify that building construction regulations were properly followed during the construction of your house. He may conduct an inspection audit of roofing and ceiling installation, plumbing, heating and air conditioning systems, storm water drainage systems, and the general structure of your home.

Another commonly misunderstood misconception is that a Property Inspector is solely responsible for inspecting buildings that are in his presently selected area. Although a Property Inspector is required by law to inspect buildings that are in his presently selected area, he is not obligated to inspect homes outside of that area. As an example, a Property Inspector is not required to inspect a new home if he fails to inspect an existing one prior to purchasing the new one. As a result of this misconception, many consumers incorrectly assume that a property inspector must inspect homes within his current area or select homes from his currently selected field of expertise.

: 10 Mistakes that Most People Make

Short Course on – Covering The Basics

Leave a Comment